The Importance of Amen (Part 1)

1.0.0 The Statement

An Individual need to be spiritually discerning in the use of “Amen.” “Amen” used with understanding brings forth blessings to an Individual/Church. “Amen” is the declaration affirming the confidence in the dynamic of God’s Order, Promises (2Corinthians 1:20) and His Christ (Revelation 3:14).

  • God’s Promises – 2Corinthians 1:20 (NKJV) “For all the Promises of God in Him are Yes, and in Him Amen, to the glory of God through us.”
  • Christ – Revelation 3:14 (NKJV) “And to the Angel of the Church of the Laodiceans write, ‘These things say the Amen (Christ), the Faithful and True Witness, the Beginning of the Creation of God.’”

1.0.1. The Reasons of Amen

  • Jesus is called “The Amen” Revelation 3:14 (NKJV) “And to the Angel of the Church of the Laodiceans write, ‘These things say the Amen (Christ), the Faithful and True Witness, the Beginning of the Creation of God.’”
  • 24 Books of the 27 Books in the New Testament end with the “Amen” (except: the Book of Acts; the Book of James and 3rd John).
  • There are 175 mentions of “Amen” in God’s Word: 25 “Amen” in the Old Testament and 150 “Amen” in the New Testament. The word “Amen” is mentioned 25 times in the Gospel of John.
  • In the New Testament, the word “Amen” is the original Greek word, which has been translated as “Verily” or “Truly.” Of the 150 mentions of “Amen” (Verily or Truly) in the New Testament, Jesus uses 101 times.
  • All of God’s Promises are Yesand Amen2Corinthians 1:20 (NKJV) “For all the Promises of God in Him (Jesus) are Yes, and in Him Amen, to the glory of God (the Father) through us.”

1.0.2. The Meaning of “Amen”

The term “Amen” in the English is “So be it” or “May it be so,” is incomplete in definition. The term “Amen” essentially means “It is faithful” or “That is true”2Corinthians 1:20 (NKJV) “For all the Promises of God in Him are Yes, and in Him Amen, to the glory of God through us.” “Amen” is derived from the Hebrews “awman,” of which the root meaning means “Built up, Supported or Made Permanent.” (Strong’s Concordance).

1.1 The Four Primary Purposes of “Amen” in O.T

  1. To Bind Oneself to an Oath.
  2. To Affirm Leadership.
  3. To Affirm Correction.
  4. To Affirm God’s Word.

1.1.1 Binds to an Oath

In the Books of Numbers and Deuteronomy, “Amen” is used 14 times, 12 times of which occur in Deuteronomy 27:15-26 and two times in Numbers 5:22. Theses passages relate to curses (God’s chastening) that will befall the Children of Israel who act in ways detrimental to the Community:

  • After each curse (chastening) was pronounced, the people were required to say, “Amen.” The declaration of “Amen” was meant for accountability.
  • And when the people said “Amen” after each statement, they were telling God that they were willing to be chastened if they disobey Him.
  • Their “Amen” was not just their agreement with the curses (chastening) spoken; it was their acceptance of the terms of the Covenant.
  • By responding with an “Amen” the Children of Israel were binding themselves with an oath and with a curse (chastening). God takes no delight in this kind of judgement, but the Children of Israel needed to be aware that their disobedience had repercussions both for the Individual and the Nation.

As the Leaders of the Nation of Israel read these curses (chastening), they were not predicting what would happen if the people disobeyed God. They were calling upon the LORD to send these curses (chastening) on His people if they turned away from Him. These curses (chastening) were closely related to the Law Moses had delivered and explained, especially the Ten Commandments. In Deuteronomy 28:1-14 the Promise of Blessings for Obedience, this response was not called for. The likely reason for this is because we human beings are generally more ready to receive blessings than we are to take responsibility for failures – especially those failures that affect others.

To be continued….. Stay Tuned…..

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